Millions of immigrants again on hold: More political moves delay immigration reform as deportations continue.

President Obama announced a delay of his executive action until after the mid-term elections in November, irritating many who anticipated immigration relief.

President Obama announced a delay of his executive action until after the mid-term elections in November, irritating many who anticipated immigration relief.

Children at recess used to play a game called “Red Light, Green Light,” where the one child faces away from the other children who start behind a line, saying “green light,” so the children behind the line can creep closer and tag them before they quickly turn around and say, “red light.” Is this the real strategy on immigration reform on Capitol Hill?

Reporting news and updates on immigration reform and the problems caused by inaction seems futile when people make promises and do not keep them. More often, people say they will make every effort at taking action, the political version of a promise. Both sides of the political aisle are frustrated with the failure to make meaningful reform to our badly outdated immigration system. As President Obama, the Democrats and Republicans in Congress continue sparring, the human casualties are mounting.

President Obama announced a delay of his executive action until after the mid-term elections in November, irritating many who anticipated immigration relief.

Earlier this summer, President Obama asked Jeh Johnson, Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security (“DHS”) to hold off on releasing the results of a review of the immigration system, so House Republicans could get together necessary votes to pass a reform bill. It never happened. When Congress adjourned for summer break, the President reported he was working on his own plan for relief through executive orders, something the House Republicans first criticized him for doing, and then suggested he take executive action after all. Meanwhile, the mid-term elections scheduled for November are the latest roadblock to reform. On Saturday September 6, The Associated Press tweeted, “BREAKING: White House officials: Obama to delay immigration action until after November election.”

Result: “Millions of immigrants will face at least 60 more days under the threat of deportation[i]

The human cost of this delay is significant. As the quote from the article indicates, millions of undocumented immigrants who anticipated relief from deportation now fear the worst. Of the millions of immigrants waiting for relief, advocates estimate that an actual 60,000 immigrants will be deported within the next 60 days.

DHS is still stating that they are, “using “prosecutorial discretion” so that resident, law-abiding unauthorized immigrants don’t get deported.[ii]” Instead, they claim, “high priority” immigrants, “those who have committed crimes, have recently entered the country, or were deported and then came back,” are the focus of current deportation activity.[iii]

The message sent by the U.S., likely heard worldwide, is that immigrants are marginalized.

Wouldn’t you feel alienated and awkward coming to a country in political turmoil over what to do about your arrival and presence? From one political party who embraces policies helping people suffering violence and injustice in their home countries, to another who would like to catapult them back to their home countries, it must be terrible not knowing who they can trust. Some compassion for people who likely are not thrilled about leaving their home countries would make for a stronger immigration stance and the current ping-pong games make U.S. leaders look foolish.

While likely feeling marginalized by a seemingly unfair political struggle, the undocumented immigrants who made it safely to the U.S. can only hope for positive change and relief, through President Obama or Congress, whoever is able to make a meaningful difference. Attorney KiKi M. Mosley also hopes for positive change in U.S. immigration policy. She will continue to offer updates and available immigration news.

Attorney KiKi M. Mosley is licensed to practice law by the State of Illinois and Louisiana. She is skilled and experienced in complex immigration law issues including and related options for undocumented immigrants seeking immigration relief. For more information about the law firm, please visit www.KiKisLaw.com, and do not forget to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” on Twitter. You can also review Attorney Mosley’s endorsements on her Avvo profile.

[i] Vox, The human cost of Obama’s delay on immigration action, by Dara Lind, Sept. 8, 2014.

[ii] See, Vox article above (HNi)

[iii] See, Vox article above (HNi)

A recent increase in immigrant children causes frustration on both sides of U.S. borders

There is an assumption among many Latino communities that children showing up alone at U.S. border will be allowed to go free.

There is an assumption among many Latino communities that children showing up alone at U.S. border will be allowed to go free.

Unaccompanied minors from Central America have been arriving at the United States/Mexico border in unprecedented numbers.   President Obama’s administration has taken measures to manage the influx of children who need shelter, sponsors, legal representation and administrative staff to document the incoming children fleeing gang violence in primarily in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador.

These children arriving in the U.S. need help, especially legal assistance, as explained in our blog article, Thousands of unaccompanied minor immigrant children need comprehensive immigration reform. If they appear at their court dates, many might not understand the process and can easily become removable to the countries from which they came despite their misunderstanding of the U.S. immigration system and its complex policies.

There is an assumption among many Latino communities that children showing up alone at U.S. border will be allowed to go free.

Violence in Central America is a common reason many families are sending their children north to seek shelter and a safer life in the U.S., often with relatives. The trip through dangerous territory is expensive and many do not make it safely to the other side. Many believe that the U.S. is lenient on children and foreign parents believe their children will be safer after crossing the border.

Lucy Cabrera was terrified during her son and daughter’s journey to the U.S. Cabrera borrowed money to pay guides in Guatemala and Mexico help get her kids safely on U.S. soil. Along the way, her children called from Honduras after gangs threatened them. Finally, they made it to their destination and called their mother from a U.S. detention facility in Arizona. “Thank God they are safe now. It all happened so fast,” said Cabrera[i].

This video that shows the reality of the situation: CNN Video – Border detention of children shames America.

Immigrants arriving in the U.S. to find overcrowding in detention centers. Many children are being dropped off at bus stations with a court date on their Notice to Appear in immigration court. If the immigrants have family in the U.S. they are released and sent on their way with pending court dates at which many will not appear as noted in a recent news report[ii]. The children who remain in detention centers face poor conditions. These border facilities lack “enough food, beds, or sanitary facilities to provide for the children,” CNN has reported.

KiKi M. Mosley is an immigration attorney who can help families with children coming to the U.S. who are given a “Notice to Appear” at immigration court. She helps them apply for relief allowed by immigration law and policy written to give undocumented immigrants options while comprehensive immigration reform is not yet passed in the U.S.

Attorney KiKi M. Mosley is licensed to practice law by the State of Illinois and Louisiana. She is skilled and experienced in complex immigration law issues including applications for temporary immigration relief and adjustments of immigration status. For more information about the law firm, please visit www.KiKisLaw.com, and do not forget to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” on Twitter. You can also review Attorney Mosley’s endorsements on her Avvo profile.

[i] Washington Post: Immigrant parents urge U.S. officials to help their children flee Central American violence. By Pamela Contable, Jun. 12, 2014.

[ii] CNN, Border detention of children shames America. By Ruben Navarrette, Jun. 12, 2014.

President Obama delays deportation review so House Republicans can seek votes to pass a reform bill

Right now, many say there is bipartisan support and we are in a window of time for action if House Republican leaders can get collect enough votes to pass a bill.

Right now, many say there is bipartisan support and we are in a window of time for action if House Republican leaders can get collect enough votes to pass a bill.

President Obama recently asked Department of Homeland Security (“DHS”) Secretary, Jeh Johnson to hold off on producing his DHS report on deportation and policy options. This March, President Obama, under pressure to take executive action to ease deportations, ordered a formal review of how we deport immigrants. DHS was scheduled to report to the president by early June. Meanwhile, in Washington, there is a window of opportunity to pass an immigration reform bill during the summer months and before the general elections coming up this fall. It is suggested that if President Obama took executive action on the report from DHS and eased up on deportations then House Republicans may take a critical position and not vote for reform. Right now, many say there is bipartisan support and we are in a window of time for action if House Republican leaders can get collect enough votes to pass a bill.

The Secure Communities policy is on the list for review.

The formal review by Secretary Johnson would include recommendations on how DHS could, as a matter of policy, limit deportations to violent criminals and give relief to non-offending immigrants. One of the current policies to be reviewed is the controversial “Secure Communities” concept that positions repeat immigration law offenders alongside violent criminals for purposes of deportation. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (“ICE”) works directly with the Federal Bureau of Investigation (“FBI”) and the Secure Communities policy provides DHS fingerprints automatically sent from the FBI to check for criminal records in immigration databases. If an individual is arrested for a criminal violation, a DHS officer may get involved to make an immigration enforcement decision. Secretary Johnson told lawmakers this week that Secured Communities should stay but should be revamped with a fresh look[i].

If President Obama does not want House Republicans paying attention to his review of how we deport people, then why does it make sense for Secretary Johnson to promote his ideas for improving the Secure Communities policy? Some critics think the president is acting in response to pressure from labor unions and conservatives who want him to wait.

Immigration advocates are upset by President Obama’s suspension of the formal review.

Dream Action Coalition advocates, critical of President Obama’s direction to hold off on the report said, “We are appalled that after so much sacrifice and hard work from the undocumented community to pressure the President to use his power to stop deportations, some organizations… [would] rather protect the administration instead of millions of families separated by deportations.[ii]

When President Obama ordered the review of our deportation systems this spring, the goal was to find a way to use the most humane methods to enforce immigration laws and policies without breaking up families unnecessarily. Attorney KiKi M. Mosley represents immigration clients who desperately want comprehensive immigration reform and no longer want to fear law enforcement as they do in the current climate of Secure Communities.

Attorney KiKi M. Mosley is licensed to practice law by the State of Illinois and Louisiana. She is skilled and experienced in complex immigration law issues including hearings before immigration courts and applications and procedures to correct clients’ records when things do not go as planned. For more information about the law firm, please visit www.KiKisLaw.com, and do not forget to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” on Twitter. You can also review Attorney Mosley’s endorsements on her Avvo profile.

[i] Politico: DHS head says controversial program should stay. By Seung Min Kim, May 29, 2014.

[ii] La Times: Obama delays deportation review to give immigration bill a chance. By Christi Parsons and Kathleen Hennessey. May 28, 2014.

Immigration computer system is up and running as the system returns to 2014 after being stuck in the 80s after meltdown

The system was down for almost six weeks, leading many to question how a failure of this magnitude could happen.

The system was down for almost six weeks, leading many to question how a failure of this magnitude could happen.

In a recent press release[1], the American Immigration Lawyers Association (“AILA”) spoke out to let people know the Executive Office for Immigration Review (“EOIR”) while, fixing the recent immigration court computer failure, is still badly underfunded. The EOIR is the federal office established to adjudicate immigration cases by “fairly, expeditiously, and uniformly interpreting and administering the Nation’s immigration laws.[2]” In this case, the EOIR was unable to do anything in a uniform manner with a failed computer system and lack of system failure preparedness.

When the system goes down the show comes to a halt and the calendars pile up.

A hardware failure caused most application of the EOIR computer system to shut down at the stroke of midnight April 12.  The system was down for almost six weeks, leading many to question how a failure of this magnitude could happen.  Data recovery specialists and teams worked to recover and restore data and applications according to news published on its website on May 19, 2014[3]. In restoring the system, IT teams worked to create new elements of information redundancy and monitoring to guard against future system issues.

Because of the computer failure, many immigrants in the court system have further rescheduled court dates in a backlogged system. AILA President Doug Stump stated, “We cheered the announcement this week that some initial fixes have been made. But the reality is that the breakdown delayed cases and created unnecessary bottlenecks.[4]

There are thousands of immigrant court respondents affected by the system failure.

The New York Post reported on the “computer meltdown” and noted how immigration courts had to use pen, paper and cassette tapes to manage cases manually without the computer system. Unable to access information on cases, some courts had to make decisions without full knowledge of particular cases before them.

Others did not get a pass or benefit of the doubt when the computers crashed. One immigration lawyer said it was like going back to the 80s. Lawyers were delayed and rescheduled, along with their clients when the system backlog prevented many from knowing if their case would actually be called when scheduled and if called, would anything be able to take place. This causes a huge problem for immigrant respondents with time sensitive matters and deadlines. A toll free phone number with case information has been playing the following message, “Due to system issues, the information on this has not been updated since midnight on April 12, 2014.[5]

What do you do if your case was delayed?

If your immigration court proceeding was affected and you either were not able to appear before the immigration court as scheduled or if nothing happened due to an inability to make an official record of proceedings you may need to take action with an attorney to file the necessary paperwork to assure you will receive a fair immigration hearing and due process allowed by law. Chicago immigration attorney, KiKi M. Mosley has been tracking this serious situation in and out of court and can help you if you have been affected by the immigration court system meltdown.

Attorney KiKi M. Mosley is licensed to practice law by the State of Illinois and Louisiana. She is skilled and experienced in complex immigration law issues including hearings before immigration courts and applications and procedures to correct clients’ records when things do not go as planned. For more information about the law firm, please visit www.KiKisLaw.com, and do not forget to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” on Twitter. You can also review Attorney Mosley’s endorsements on her Avvo profile.

[1] AILA: Immigration Court Computer Failure Emphasizes Need for Increased Funding. Released May 21, 2014.

[2] The U.S. Department of Justice website for the Executive Office for Immigration Review: EOIR Home.

[3] The U.S. Department of Justice Executive Office for Immigration Review, EOIR News of System Update, Monday, May 19, 2014.

[4] See AILA article above.

[5] Politico Blogs, Immigration court tech crash drags on. By Josh Gerstein, May 14, 2012.

Criminal conduct can lead to nonimmigrant visa revocation and removal from the U.S.

Once a nonimmigrant visa is revoked ICE may initiate removal proceedings to deport the individual if they otherwise do not voluntary leave the U.S.

Once a nonimmigrant visa is revoked ICE may initiate removal proceedings to deport the individual if they otherwise do not voluntary leave the U.S.

Justin Bieber’s recent arrest in Florida for DUI, street racing and resisting arrest without violence has people talking about immigration as the singer is not an American citizen.  Bieber is a Canadian residing in the U.S. on a performance visa known as an O-1 visa, described by the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”) as follows: “The O-1 nonimmigrant visa is for the individual who possesses extraordinary ability in the sciences, arts, education, business, or athletics, or who has a demonstrated record of extraordinary achievement in the motion picture or television industry and has been recognized nationally or internationally for those achievements.[i]” If convicted on pending and possible charges from several recent incidents, Bieber could be deported, according to one Immigration and Customs Enforcement (“ICE”) agent quoted in the article, “Justin Bieber Drugs, Rehab and Deportation According to ICE Official.[ii]

Nonimmigrant visas can be revoked for several reasons including criminal conduct.

When a nonimmigrant visa applicant seeks a visa to come to the U.S. to work, they apply through a U.S. embassy consular office and that visa can be revoked if the visa holder becomes ineligible to maintain the nonimmigrant visa, which can occur for a variety of reasons. There are criminal and related grounds for visa ineligibility, among other additional reasons a visa can be revoked.  An excerpt from the statute containing grounds for visa revocation identifies criminal and related issues and states, “…any alien convicted of, or who admits having committed, or who admits committing acts which constitute the essential elements of (I) a crime involving moral turpitude (other than a purely political offense) or an attempt or conspiracy to commit such a crime, or (II) a violation of (or a conspiracy or attempt to violate) any law or regulation of a State, the United States, or a foreign country relating to a controlled substance…[iii]

What constitutes a crime of moral turpitude, for purposes of visa ineligibility, is a unique question best answered on a case-by-case basis, and a licensed immigration attorney may be necessary to represent the nonimmigrant. While it may not always be clear what constitutes a crime for moral turpitude, it is clear that multiple criminal convictions can trigger visa revocation and deportation. In addition to what is stated above, the ineligibility statute also states regarding multiple convictions, “Any alien convicted of 2 or more offenses (other than purely political offenses), regardless of whether the conviction was in a single trial or whether the offenses arose from a single scheme of misconduct and regardless of whether the offenses involved moral turpitude, for which the aggregate sentences to confinement were 5 years or more is inadmissible.” In other words, the combination of options that could trigger visa revocation can be complex.

What happens if a nonimmigrant visa is revoked as a result of criminal activity?

If revoked, the visa will be stamped “REVOKED” and if the visa holder is not present at the time of revocation (or the visa is not available) additional authorities may be notified, including airline personnel. Once a visa is revoked the holder will not be permitted to enter the U.S. and can be detained while traveling to the U.S. Once a nonimmigrant visa is revoked ICE may initiate removal proceedings to deport the individual if they otherwise do not voluntary leave the U.S. Note that ICE may use “prosecutorial discretion” in deciding whether to proceed with removal. Click/tap here to read more about prosecutorial discretion.

Removal proceedings can be challenged and a visa reinstatement may also be applied for by the nonimmigrant visa holder and/or their attorney. The complex immigration and criminal law rules are best followed with an experienced licensed immigration attorney who understands the effect of the options available in criminal courts and how they can affect nonimmigrant visa status.

If you or someone you know who holds a nonimmigrant visa is involved in police activity and is charged with an offense, which if convicted could trigger deportation, you can call the Law Offices of KiKi M. Mosley to learn what options are available to prevent being deported. Attorney KiKi M. Mosley is licensed to practice law by the State of Illinois and Louisiana. She is skilled and experienced in complex immigration law issues. For more information about the law firm, please tap/click here to visit the rest of the website, and do not forget to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” on Twitter or Google Plus.

Prosecutorial Discretion in Immigration Enforcement

What happens if an undocumented person is detained by ICE but poses no significant threat to safety or security?

What happens if an undocumented person is detained by ICE but poses no significant threat to safety or security?

A recent article in the L.A. Times highlighted a reported rise in the use of prosecutorial discretion in United States immigration system. There are many undocumented immigrants in the U.S., many of whom want nothing more than to reside in the U.S. legally in hope of eventually obtaining U.S. citizenship. ICE officers and their departments are under a directive to prioritize whom they prosecute under the current immigration laws for removal.  They are expected to target those with criminal backgrounds and those whom they otherwise believe pose a threat to national security.

The article on prosecutorial discretion suggests that, “Immigrants facing deportation are increasingly likely to have their cases dismissed because of mitigating factors such as having U.S. citizen children, according to an analysis by researchers at Syracuse University.”[i]  In reality, the use of prosecutorial discretion varies widely between jurisdictions and is often up to the attorney assigned to the case at that particular time by the Office of Chief Counsel for DSH/ICE.

Prosecutorial discretion in immigration means ICE should focus on national security and public safety.

In 2011, the director of ICE, Mr. John Morton, issued a memorandum directing that immigration officials review a few factors before making the decision to prosecute the individual and seek a removal order from the very busy immigration courts. Factors for consideration include how many years the person has been living in the U.S., how and when they arrived in the U.S. (as a child 10 years ago?), whether their family members served in the military, and also the person’s relationship to other family members who are U.S. citizens[ii].

The 2011 orders sent to ICE field office directors, special agents in charge and chief counsel focus on the civil immigration enforcement priorities. The memo states in its “Background” section that, “ICE must prioritize the use of its enforcement personnel, detention space, and removal assets to ensure that the aliens it removes represent, as much as reasonably possible, the agency’s enforcement priorities, namely the promotion of national security, border security, public safety, and the integrity of the immigration system.”

What happens if an undocumented person is detained by ICE but poses no significant threat to safety or security?

If an undocumented immigrant is arrested and detained on suspicion of being a threat to public safety, as ICE memorandums describe, an attorney can intervene and work to negotiate a release or dismissal of pending charges, as suggested in the Los Angeles Times article suggesting more frequently, ICE is using prosecutorial discretion and letting people go about their lives.  If you want to learn more about prosecutorial discretion or believe someone you know if being improperly detained and prosecuted you can call attorney KiKi M. Mosley to find out what options might be available to help.

Attorney KiKi M. Mosley is licensed to practice law by the State of Illinois and Louisiana. She is skilled and experienced in complex immigration law issues. For more information about the law firm, please tap/click here to visit the rest of the website, and do not forget to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” on Twitter or Google Plus.


[i] Los Angeles Times: Prosecutorial discretion on the rise in immigration courts. By Cindy Chang. Jan. 15, 2014

[ii] U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Prosecutorial Discretion Memorandum. By John Morton, June 17, 2011.

Decreases in deportation: less enforcement is not immigration reform, but appreciate the policy effort.

If ICE officials have more choices in enforcing immigration laws, who is not being deported?

If ICE officials have more choices in enforcing immigration laws, who is not being deported?

Under President Obama’s oversight, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security office of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (“ICE”) is deporting less undocumented immigrants in connection with its new policy limiting enforcement resources on, ““public safety, national security and border security,” said ICE spokeswoman Barbara Gonzales.[i]” “ICE has been vocal about the shift in our immigration-enforcement strategy,” she said. “Our removal numbers illustrate this.” The Center for Immigration Studies published their report in October 2013, titled, “Deportation Numbers Unwrapped. Raw Statistics Reveal the Real Story of ICE Enforcement in Decline,” and as to the source of information, CIS states, “This report examines data from a collection of mostly unpublished internal Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and ICE statistics, to provide an alternative evaluation of the administration’s record on immigration enforcement that is based on raw statistics rather than pre-packaged press kits.[ii]

If ICE officials have more choices in enforcing immigration laws, who is not being deported?

Central to the disagreement among Democrats and Republican lawmakers are many of the approximately 12 million undocumented immigrants who may, for all intents and purposes, live among U.S. citizens day to day without any call to consider their immigration or citizenship status. As indicated in the CIS report, a 2011 ICE memorandum directed officers, “not to arrest certain broad categories of illegal aliens, including minor criminals, long-time residents, students, parents, caregivers, and a long list of other excepted categories for whom there was otherwise no statutory basis for special treatment.” Despite a policy decreasing the number of new arrests and detentions, there are still thousands of the same people stuck in the immigration court system, waiting for asylum hearings, waiting in detention facilities, and waiting to move forward with life.

How will ICE officers determine who should be targeted for arrest and detention?

A policy directive suggesting ICE officers not arrest and detain the less threatening illegal immigrants to the U.S. does not guarantee any sense of safety for undocumented residents living in fear. Imagine you are driving around on a suspended drivers license and fear all it would take is for another driver to hit you to expose your illegal presence to a law enforcement officer. No, you probably should not drive on a suspended drivers license, but many do, and have little choice. The necessity to get yourself and family members to work or school, for instance, can create fear in undocumented immigrants who may wonder when their luck may run out and they are arrested and detained for not being present in the U.S. with a lawful immigration status.

President Obama said during his (re)election campaign(s) that he would work to provide undocumented residents with a pathway to citizenship. The decrease in the number of ICE arrests and deportations must give some people a feeling of safety. Meanwhile, critics of immigration reform must argue that an effort to reduce enforcement of out-of-date laws does not cure the underlying problem that those old laws do not reflect the spirit of the will of the people in the United States.

In the event you, a friend or family member is arrested and detained by ICE officers, you should immediately contact an attorney to learn what, if any, rights you or the detained person has, and how the detention and removal processes work and how the attorney can help.

The Law Office of KiKi M. Mosley, works to counsel and represent detained immigrants and file the proper petitions with immigration courts necessary to protect an undocumented man, woman or child. Attorney KiKi M. Mosley is licensed to practice law by the State of Illinois and Louisiana. She is skilled and experienced in complex immigration law issues. For more information about the law firm, please tap/click here to visit the rest of the website, and do not forget to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” on Twitter or Google Plus.


[i] Bloomberg Businessweek: Deportations Drop as Obama Pushes for New Immigration Law. By Michael C. Bender, Dec. 17, 2013.