Attorney KiKi M. Mosley interviewed about immigration reform and new immigration options

Chicago Immigration Attorney, KiKi M. Mosley was recently interviewed on the Law Talk Radio Internet radio podcast regarding immigration reform and new options for immigrants seeking legal status.

Immigration reform has been in the spotlight of several news programs, professional groups and several websites and social media pages devoted to the development of a United States immigration system that reflects present day values, politics and a mobile work force. Comprehensive reform remains a goal of many and today immigration attorney, KiKi M. Mosely is our guest to share correct information about the status of immigration and reform today.

Immigration reform has been in the spotlight of several news programs, professional groups and several websites and social media pages devoted to the development of a United States immigration system that reflects present day values, politics and a mobile work force. Comprehensive reform remains a goal of many and today immigration attorney, KiKi M. Mosely is our guest to share correct information about the status of immigration and reform today.

Attorney Mosley explained that comprehensive immigration reform is not yet the law in the United States. Rather, the proposed bill better known as “Boarder Security Economic Opportunity and Immigration Modernization Act, also known as S744,” did pass the United States Senate but it failed in the House of Representatives.   Attorney Mosley further stated that she receives two to three calls per day from people seeking protection under what they believe is the new immigration reform law. Additionally, she suggests that what we may end up seeing in the way of reform could appear somewhat different from the currently proposed bill.

Is there a reason opponents to S744 dislike the bill or is this just partisan opposition?

The main sticking point according to Attorney Mosley is Southern border security, and many Republican oppose the current bill as written. The five main sections of the current bill are generally referred to as: Boarder Security; Immigrant Visas; Interior Enforcement (of current immigration laws); Reform to the Non-Immigrant Visa program; and Jobs for Youths.

Topics covered in the Law Talk Radio interview, (click/tap the title to listen) “About Immigration Reform and Options with KiKi M. Mosley” include the following: (1) The status of our immigration system today and the issues regarding reform; (2) What immigrants to the U.S. should know about Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA); (3) Provisional (Stateside) Waivers, who may apply for them and what is involved; (4) Additional advice for men, women and families desiring U.S. citizenship.

Highlights of this interview address immigration reform, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, Provisional Waivers and immigration information, generally.

Everyone wants “the new law,” but again, things are still in the air until the House of Representatives votes to pass a version of the Act satisfying Southern Border Security concerns.

What is unique about the Bill as proposed are the five elements are tied together with a system of triggers and stages. By example, in order for the Registered Provisional Immigrant Status, to come into effect, which would allow undocumented immigrants “come online” and drive legally, and make steps to move closer to lawful permanent residence, this subsection may require agreement and accomplishment on Southern Border Security.

Attorney Mosley also opined that many of the members of the House of Representatives are not happy with the notion that several thousand undocumented immigrants who entered illegally may be rewarded with a Registered Provisional Immigrant Status. She identified a few bars to this status, such as drinking and driving violations, criminal convictions, domestic violence infractions and so forth.

Listen to the interview by clicking/tapping here to listen to further detail and explanations about the RPI program and more immigration reform issues including Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals and Provisional (Stateside) Waivers.

Attorney KiKi M. Mosley is licensed to practice law by the State of Illinois and Louisiana. She is skilled and experienced in complex immigration law issues. For more information about the law firm, please tap/click here to visit the rest of the website, and do not forget to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” on Twitter or Google Plus.

Illinois is soon to issue Temporary Visitor Drivers Licenses to undocumented immigrants

The Secretary of State's office issues a Temporary Visitor Driver's License (TVDL) for non-citizens of the United States who have been granted temporary, legal entry into this country and are temporarily residing in the State of Illinois and ineligible for a Social Security number.

The Secretary of State’s office issues a Temporary Visitor Driver’s License (TVDL) for non-citizens of the United States who have been granted temporary, legal entry into this country and are temporarily residing in the State of Illinois and ineligible for a Social Security number.

On any given day, just over 4% of the population of the State of Illinois, 525,000 undocumented immigrants (according to a recent Chicago Sun-Times article[i]) drive to work, school, grocery stores, and so on, but without a driver’s license. Things in Illinois are about to change, however, and the Secretary of State’s new program, signed into law by Gov. Pat Quinn on January 27, 2013[ii], will allow Illinois residents on their path to citizenship drive legally. Traffic stops and citations have plagued undocumented drivers for years, sometimes introducing these drivers to the criminal justice system and triggering the attention of ICE officers.

All it takes is a traffic stop for burned out license plate lights to trigger a myriad of legal troubles for hard working parents just trying to make their way in Chicagoland and feed their families and get them to school. Temporary workers and foreign students are already allowed temporary driving privileges. With the new law allowing for the issuance of a Temporary Visitor Driver’s License (TVDL), undocumented immigrant drivers will be able to buy automobile insurance as well.

Republican leaders backing the bill, as a safety measure, address the issue of undocumented drivers.

Bi-Partisan support for Senate Bill 597 led to the passage of the bill that made it law in the State of Illinois that undocumented immigrants will be allowed to apply for temporary drivers licenses. Written road and vision tests are required. The temporary license is not effective as identification, to vote, to board a plane, but simply for driving only. Illinois lawmakers made many revisions to the bill over time. Many supporters stated that the need for public safety and insured drivers is good for all drivers in Illinois. “I don’t want to get hit by someone who doesn’t have insurance,” said State Comptroller, Judy Barr Topinka. “They have to get to work, they have to get to school, they have to get to daycare,” Topinka said.

Learn more by visiting the Illinois Secretary of State website with additional information.

The Illinois Secretary of State, during a 10-month period after the law was passed in January, will, according to their website, “develop procedures for implementation of the legislation, such as what documents the applicant must present and which facilities will be issuing TVDLs to undocumented immigrants.” Here is a link you can click/tap here to learn more. Further, “The goal of the office is to ensure the program is implemented in a way that improves traffic safety, underscores the importance of driver’s license integrity and security, and provides the highest level of customer service,” states the Illinois Secretary of State website.

If you or a friend may be eligible to apply for a Temporary Visitor Drivers License, you may contact the Law Offices of KiKi M. Mosley for assistance in determining what needs to be done to obtain the license. Attorney KiKi M. Mosley is licensed to practice law by the State of Illinois and Louisiana. She is skilled and experienced in complex immigration law issues. For more information about the law firm, please tap/click here to visit the rest of the website, and do not forget to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” on Twitter or Google Plus.