About student visas and opportunities to study in the U.S.

"Generally, a citizen of a foreign country who wishes to enter the United States must first obtain a visa, either a nonimmigrant visa for temporary stay, or an immigrant visa for permanent residence. You must have a student visa to study in the United States." U.S. Department of State

“Generally, a citizen of a foreign country who wishes to enter the United States must first obtain a visa, either a nonimmigrant visa for temporary stay, or an immigrant visa for permanent residence. You must have a student visa to study in the United States.” U.S. Department of State

High school students who grow up in prospering, yet still developing countries, have many choices to make when they consider their options for college. Many more of these students now consider colleges and universities in the U.S. Current social media enhances these families ability to explore what the United States has to offer, educationally.   The U.S. Department of State issues student visas, often known as F-1 and M-1 visas, allowing a citizen of a foreign country to enter the U.S. to study at an approved school. The F-1 visa is the most commonly issued visa covering most forms of study, most commonly high school, college, and private elementary schools (often used by the children of foreign workers living in the U.S.), while the M-1 visa is specifically reserved for vocational and technical schools[i]. There are several visa options that match the duration and type of education program involved.

Before applying for a visa, the student must first be accepted to an approved school.

If students first apply and are accepted to approved schools, they are then able to apply for the proper student visa through a U.S. embassy or consulate.  Some student visa applicants are already in the U.S. under other types of visas and applications to transfer to a student visa can be difficult and immigration attorneys help students and their families with the application processes.

Recipients of student visas often find that they have a need, during or at the conclusion of their tenure as a student, to transition to an employment-based visa or perhaps a family-based upon.  It is important that students know their legal options well ahead of graduation as these processes can often take a great deal of time and planning.

The process of obtaining a visa and transferring to a new visa is complex and it is best to work with an immigration attorney.

The attorneys at the Law Offices of KiKi M. Mosley work with student visa applicants and can explain the process and what a student visa applicant can expect. It is important to be careful and be aware of “notarios” and/or “immigration consultants” who are not attorneys and are not allowed to represent student visa applicants. Anyone considering applying for a student visa should ask many questions and be assured they and their families understand the process.

Attorney KiKi M. Mosley is licensed to practice law by the State of Illinois and Louisiana. She is skilled and experienced in complex immigration law issues and can help with the process of applying for and maintaining student visas.  Ms. Mosley can practice immigration law in any of the 50 United States, U.S. territories, and consulates abroad.   For more information about the law firm, please tap/click here to visit the rest of the website, and do not forget to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” on Twitter or Google Plus.

Coming to study in the U.S. can be a big decision not to take lightly.

Finally, anyone considering coming to the U.S. to study should think about the impact on friends, families and employers. Some students come to the U.S. to study and intend to move back to their home country immediately after graduation. What happens if you come to the U.S. and fall in love and get married. Will you still return to your home country? Will you stay in the U.S. and get married? If so, will your mother, sister or brother want to come to the U.S. to share in adventure? There are so many questions we can all ask when thinking about student visas and immigration. Please feel free to contact the Law Offices of KiKi M. Mosley to ask any questions you may have about student visas and immigration.


[i] U.S. Department of State website: Student visas

News and social media dialogue are great for immigration debate

2010 was a big year in immigration news and Arizona’s SB 1070 is still a frequently discussed topic among immigration attorneys, the clients the serve, and frankly, most U.S. residents in Arizona and from coast to coast. In fact, there are popular Facebook pages dedicated to SB 1070, such as, “Poets Responding to SB 1070,” which has 7,480 “likes” to date! A recent post calls for more poets to submit their content. Maybe you’re a poet and just don’t yet know it? In any case, the volume of the response to a law that caused such a heated debate is compelling.

Poets gather here to respond to Arizona SB 1070, a law that targets immigrants and legalizes racial profiling. We feature poetry and immigrant human rights news.

Poets gather here to respond to Arizona SB 1070, a law that targets immigrants and legalizes racial profiling. We feature poetry and immigrant human rights news.

The poet’s page contains commentary on a wide variety of immigration and societal issues also including race and responses to the George Zimmerman not-guilty verdict. Social media pages collecting opinions of all types and from all backgrounds is helpful to the development of (sometimes strong) dialogue and the exchange of information and ideas about immigration issues.

The recent U.S. Supreme Court decision – some like it and some don’t.

Even though more than 14 months passed since the U.S. Supreme Court’s addressing the Arizona SB 1070 case, people are still talking because the issues at the core of debates are still active in the minds of many. SB 1070 became a household term in many homes, not only in the U.S. Many people continue joining in the dialogue to support or oppose Arizona’s law, particularly this summer, as the Supreme Court issued its ruling in the case of Arizona v. United States, “ruling that some aspects of the statute intended to deter unlawfully present aliens from remaining in the state were preempted by federal law, but also holding that Arizona police were not facially preempted from running immigration status checks on persons stopped for state or local offenses.[i]

In Arizona, CBS 5 AZ – KPHO reported: “SB 1070 decision sparks reaction from both sides”

Social media and the sharing of news stories is important to immigration debates. Love it or hate it, people shared this article on their Facebook pages that opens the floodgates of likes and dislikes of all the politicians and officials who had something to say.[ii]

“The Supreme Court’s decision today regarding SB 1070 is a mixed bag at best. But one thing is certain: with its efforts suing Arizona, the Obama Administration has focused time and resources that could have been better spent securing the border.”

– U.S. Rep. Jeff Flake, R-AZ

“The Supreme Court announced a major decision that will affect people in our state and across the country. It’s important to note that today is not about winning. Today is about changing the way we approach immigration reform. Divisive policies and patchwork processes do nothing to solve the immigration issue. Even worse, such practices take focus away from other issues important to Arizona families, like education and job creation. We must have clear, rational and substantive immigration reform that provides law enforcement officers with the resources they need to do their jobs. Then and only then, can we truly call it a win.”

– Rep. Lynne Pancrazi, D-Yuma

The Law Office of KiKi M. Mosley works hard to help educate clients, colleagues and friends about the compelling issues in immigration, including debates on immigration reform. Feel free to share our blog and to comment and join in the conversation on our blog and on our Facebook and Twitter pages.


[i] CRS Report for Congress, Prepared for Members of Committees of Congress, Arizona v. United States: A limited Role for States in Immigration Enforcement

American Immigration Council Executive Director, Ben Johnson, addresses House committee

A recent immigration news blog reported the oral testimony of Benjamin Johnson, Executive Director of the American Immigration Council before the House of Representatives, Committee of the Judiciary, Subcommittee on Immigration and Boarder Security.[i] Johnson spoke about, “building a 21st century America: one that prospers and grows.” Growth and prosperity, according to many proponents of fair immigration reform, happens when a collective mix of people with a variety of backgrounds work together to create new jobs and a more effective workforce. “In other words, the quest for talent, and the role of immigrants as job creators, entrepreneurs, and innovators, is not an isolated enterprise. It is and should be an integral component of a broad based, comprehensive immigration reform,” Johnson said.

Johnson blames the current immigration system for preventing immigrant job creation. In 2010, he appeared on Fox News in a short debate on a study’s findings regarding the economic impact of immigration reform in the U.S.

Do you think it makes sense that America should welcome the smartest workforce with the best experience base? Most people will say yes to this question, but when you ask them if the smartest and most experienced workers should come from outside U.S. boarders, some say no. In his speech, Johnson addressed the concern that foreign-born workers will compete for U.S. citizens’ jobs. Not true according to Johnson, “…the overwhelming evidence finds that immigrants complement rather than compete with native born workers, and their presence in our workforce has a positive impact on the wages of all workers.” In his remarks to the committee, Johnson also talked about ‘skill gaps’ in many industries where there’s a great demand for high-skilled workers in knowledge-based economies where high-tech companies are founded immigrants.

The Law Office of KiKi M. Mosley works hard to help educate clients, colleagues and friends about the compelling issues in immigration, including debates on immigration reform. Feel free to share our blog and to comment and join in the conversation on our blog and on our Facebook and Twitter pages.