Department of Homeland Security announces Temporary Protected Status: Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone

TPS

The following is an announcement by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, announcing Temporary Protected Status for Liberia, Guinea, and Sierra Leone.

For more general information, please read our article explaining Temporary Protected Status.

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Due to the outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa, Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson has announced his decision to designate Liberia, Guinea, and Sierra Leone for Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for 18 months.  As a result, eligible nationals of Liberia, Guinea, and Sierra Leone who are currently residing in the United States may apply for TPS with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). The Federal Register notices provide details and procedures for applying for TPS and are available at www.uscis.gov/tps.

The TPS designations for the three countries are effective Nov. 21, 2014 and will be in effect for 18 months. The designations mean that eligible nationals of Liberia, Guinea, and Sierra Leone (and people without nationality who last habitually resided in one of those three countries) will not be removed from the United States and are authorized to work and obtain an Employment Authorization Document (EAD). The 180-day TPS registration period begins Nov. 21, 2014 and runs through May 20, 2015.

To be eligible for TPS, applicants must demonstrate that they satisfy all eligibility criteria, including that they have been “continuously residing” in the United States since Nov. 20, 2014 and “continuously physically present in” the United States since Nov. 21, 2014.  Applicants also undergo thorough security checks.  Individuals with certain criminal records or who pose a threat to national security are not eligible for TPS. The eligibility requirements are fully described in the Federal Register notices and on the TPS Web page at www.uscis.gov/tps

Liberians currently covered under the two-year extension of Deferred Enforced Departure (DED) based on President Obama’s Sept. 26, 2014 memorandum may apply for TPS. If they do not apply for TPS within the initial 180-day registration period, they risk being ineligible for TPS because they will have missed the initial registration period. Liberians covered by DED who already possess or have applied for an EAD do not need to also apply for one related to this TPS designation. However, such individuals who are granted TPS may request a TPS-related EAD at a later date as long as the TPS designation for Liberia remains in effect.

Applicants may request that USCIS waive any or all fees based on demonstrated inability to pay by filing Form I-912, Request for Fee Waiver, or by submitting a written request. Fee-waiver requests must be accompanied by supporting documentation. USCIS will reject any TPS application that does not include the required filing fee or a properly documented fee-waiver request.

All USCIS forms are free. Applicants can download these forms from the USCIS website at www.uscis.gov/forms or request them by calling USCIS toll-free at 1-800-870-3676.

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Attorney KiKi M. Mosley is licensed to practice law by the State of Illinois and Louisiana. She is skilled and experienced in complex immigration law issues. For more information about the law firm, please visit www.KiKisLaw.com, and do not forget to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” on Twitter. You can also review Attorney Mosley’s endorsements on her Avvo profile.

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President Obama to reduce refugee allotments for Central Americans but calls for alternative program to benefit foreign applicants

The new programs President Obama wants would allow eligible people to apply for refugee status from other countries before they arrive on U.S. soil.

The new programs President Obama wants would allow eligible people to apply for refugee status from other countries before they arrive on U.S. soil.

There is a limit on the number of foreign individuals allowed to apply for refugee relief and resettlement assistance in the U.S. under special humanitarian concern. Last week President Obama reduced the limit for Central American refugees, despite the recent increase in arrivals from the Central American countries where crime and gang violence drove more than 60,000 families from their homes; the overall refugee admissions limit for fiscal year 2015 is the same as 2014, at 70,000. President Obama announced his interest in new programs for asylum seekers. In connection therewith, the allotment for people from Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador is 4,000 down from the allotment of 5,000 for the current fiscal year.

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”) website contains general information about refugee and asylum status. The current allotment reduction for Central Americans concerns refugee status, defined by USCIS as, “A form of protection that may be granted to people who meet the definition of refugee and who are special humanitarian concern to the United States. Refugees are generally people outside of their country who are unable or unwilling to return home because they fear serious harm.[i]

The serious harm people often fear is that they will be or have been persecuted for reasons of t heir political opinion, membership in certain groups, sex, nationality, race and origin, to name a few. A variety of factors contributes to the balance of serious harm to people and humanitarian factors. Often major events, including weather catastrophes like a tsunami causing massive destruction can influence the allotments of admission to the refugee relief programs.

Here is a list of the new allotments[ii]:

  • Africa 17,000
  • East Asia 13,000
  • Europe and Central Asia 1,000
  • Latin America and Caribbean 4,000
  • Near East and South Asia 33,000
  • Unallocated Reserve 2,000

The new programs President Obama wants would allow eligible people to apply for refugee status from other countries before they arrive on U.S. soil. Specifically, the programs the president wants developed would allow Central Americans to apply for refugee status from within their own countries.[iii] In Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala, people could benefit from a program that would give them greater security when seeking to apply for immigration relief, rather than risk detention for unlawful presence and experiencing rough conditions in the U.S. Department of Homeland Security residential facilities for undocumented immigrants arriving on U.S. soil.

There are several options President Obama may have in ordering the establishment of a refugee program of this kind and Chicago immigration attorney KiKi M. Mosley will follow the progress of this type of immigration reform effort to keep clients and colleagues up to date as the Obama administration works towards solving problems in the broken U.S. immigration system.

Attorney KiKi M. Mosley is licensed to practice law by the State of Illinois and Louisiana. She is skilled and experienced in complex immigration law issues including and related options for undocumented immigrants seeking immigration relief. For more information about the law firm, please visit www.KiKisLaw.com, and do not forget to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” on Twitter. You can also review Attorney Mosley’s endorsements on her Avvo profile.

[i] USCIS website: Refugees & Asylum

[ii] The White House Office of the Press Secretary: Presidential Memorandum – – FY 2015 Refugee Admissions

[iii] Immigration Impact, Proposed Refugee Program Limited in Central American Impact, by Amy Grenier, Oct. 3, 2014.

Immigration reform: Requests to separate immigration courts and judges from the Justice Department

The United States Department of Justice (DOJ), also known as the Justice Department, is the U.S. federal executive department responsible for the enforcement of the law and administration of justice. The Department is led by the Attorney General, who is nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate and is a member of the Cabinet. The current Attorney General is Eric Holder.

The United States Department of Justice (DOJ), also known as the Justice Department, is the U.S. federal executive department responsible for the enforcement of the law and administration of justice. The Department is led by the Attorney General, who is nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate and is a member of the Cabinet. The current Attorney General is Eric Holder.

Immigration Judges and courts are different from most courts because the legal process in immigration is not a function of the Judicial Branch of government, but rather it is part of the Executive Branch, reporting to the U.S. Department of Justice (“DOJ”). According to leaders from the National Association of Immigration Judges (“NAIJ”), this is a significant problem and impediment to doing real justice. As employees of the DOJ Executive Office for Immigration Review, the Immigration Judges who also act as the attorney for the DOJ and must follow orders and policy from the Executive Branch. Recently when President Obama directed Immigration Judges to start hearing newly arrived immigrant children’s cases, solely before their other pending cases, some of those judges started to speak up and state their objections.

Judge Dana Leigh Marks is the president of NAJI and she is speaking out, calling for the separation of immigration courts from the DOJ. In several published articles, Marks highlights the irony in the system where judges and courts are funded and overseen by the agency established to implement and prosecute immigration laws. Marks recently stated, “Our goal is to serve as a neutral court, but paradoxically we are housed in a law enforcement agency.[i]” Further, she highlighted, “There is no other court system in which the government would be allowed to order a total overhaul of the docket, placing particular cases at the top.[ii]

Congress has yet to move forward on comprehensive immigration reform, but if and when they do, these Immigration Judges want separate immigration courts.

The organized union for Immigration Judges was represented at a recent National Press Club event, in part, by Denise Noonan Slavin, the union’s executive vice president. Salvin spoke with Judge Marks and rhetorically asked, “If your gas tank has a leak do you keep filling it up with gas or do you fix it first?[iii]

Not only is the gas tank leaking, as you might say, the line for gas is out the door; many say the underfunding of the current immigration courts is to blame for a massive backlog of 375,000 immigration cases, seen by 227 field judges who hear cases.[iv] Judge Marks is one of those judges and she alone has over 2,400 pending cases. The next case set on Judge Marks’ calendar might be heard three and a half years from its filing date.[v]

Article I of the U.S. Constitution provides for the establishment of courts.

Like the court systems for tax and bankruptcy, immigration courts, independent of the DOJ, could be established under Article I of the Constitution.[vi] While the cost of establishing a new court structure under the Judicial Branch could be significant, the savings of time and resources could make it well worth the investment. Judge Marks suggests, “This would free them (judges) from any control or influence by the Attorney General or Department of Homeland Security.[vii]

Whether comprehensive immigration reform would include new immigration courts is unknown and there have not yet been significant responses from members of Congress on this subject. Meanwhile, it is likely certain that advocates for sensible immigration reform, like Judge Marks, will continue pushing the case to remove the immigration courts and judges from the Executive Branch.

KiKi M. Mosley is an immigration attorney who represents immigration clients and experiences the backlog of cases and troubled system first-hand, and works diligently to share ideas for system reform. Attorney KiKi M. Mosley is licensed to practice law by the State of Illinois and Louisiana. She is skilled and experienced in complex immigration law issues. For more information, please visit www.KiKisLaw.com, and do not forget to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” on Twitter. You can also review Attorney Mosley’s endorsements on her Avvo profile.

[i] PBS News hour, the Rundown, Immigration Judges’ union seeks independent court system, by Alicia Caldwell, Associated Press, Aug. 27, 2014.

[ii][ii] See PBS article at FNi

[iii] See PBS article at FNi

[iv] AZcentral, 12 News, Immigration Judges urge removal from Justice jurisdiction, by Erin Kelly, Gannet Washington Bureau, Aug. 27, 201.

[v] See AZCentral article at FNiv

[vi] Power…to constitute tribunals inferior to the Supreme Court. Article I U.S. Constitution.

[vii] The Hill, Let Immigration Judges be judges, by Dana Leigh Marks, May 9, 2013.

Predator Drones: Four years of use in US border security in review

To learn more about coming to the U.S. without worrying about predator drones overhead, call a licensed immigration attorney who can help answer questions about the legal immigration processes.

To learn more about coming to the U.S. without worrying about predator drones overhead, call a licensed immigration attorney who can help answer questions about the legal immigration processes.

The use of predator drones in the war on drugs and to secure the US borders is hardly new. In 2010 many news reports covered the use of unmanned predator drones to patrol 2,000 miles of the U.S. border with Mexico, from Texas to California. As time has passed, the war on drugs and immigrants crossing the border continues and more drones are being used. Much to the chagrin of Americans complaining about the price of the drone program and the loss of privacy, Customs and Border Patrol (“CBP”) has been able to increase the use of drones by supporting culture of fear in the U.S. to garner support the program.

The blogging world loves to talk about the drone program from both positive and negative viewpoints, often reporting shocking ideas. Putting the “extreme” aside, the following is a collection of news quotes and clips about predator drones and their use in border security from 2010 to 2014. Enjoy the articles and form your own independent opinion. The more you read from various sources the more you can piece together what is really happening out there.

2010 – CBS News – Predator Drones Shift From Battlefield to Border

“Most people coming across the border are either migrants or drug smugglers,” said Gasho. “We don’t know who they are. They could be terrorists. They could be people who have intentions of harm against the United States.”

“Policing the 2,000-mile-long border with Mexico is more than a full-time job for some 17,000 U.S. Border Patrol agents, but the predators help shrink that challenge. They’re able to peer miles into Mexico.”

“In the last five years, predators have helped net 40,000 pounds of drugs and nab 7,000 illegal immigrants, according to Homeland Security.”

2011 – Washington Post – More Predator Drones Fly US-Mexico Border

“Fans of the Predators say the $20 million aircraft are a perfect platform to keep a watchful eye on America’s rugged borders, but critics say the drones are expensive, invasive and finicky toys that have done little — compared with what Border Patrol agents do on the ground — to stem the flow of illegal immigrants, drug smugglers or terrorists.”

“Eight Predators fly for the Customs and Border Protection agency — five, and soon to be six, along the southwestern border. After a slow rollout that began in 2005, drones now patrol most of the southern boundary, from Yuma, Ariz., to Brownsville, Tex.”

“Planning documents for the CBP envision as many as 24 Predators and their maritime variants in the air by 2016, giving the agency the ability to deploy a drone anywhere over the continental United States within three hours.”

“Privacy watchdogs are concerned about the use of drones over domestic airspace. “The loss of privacy is real. You want to sunbathe in the nude on your own property? Now you can’t be sure nobody is watching you,” said Jay Stanley, a senior policy analyst for the American Civil Liberties Union. “Americans will have to wonder if our enthusiasm for catching illegal immigrants is worth sacrificing our freedoms.””

“With an hour of flight time costing $3,600, it costs about $7,054 for each illegal immigrant or smuggler caught, based on numbers calculated from a recent Government Accountability Office report to Congress. The government has spent $240 million buying and maintaining its domestic drones, not including their operation.”

2012 – Huffington Post – U.S. Border Patrol Increases Use Of Unmanned Drones For Surveillance

“The U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agency is ramping up its use of fancy technology to monitor the nation’s borders again — this time by opening up Washington’s airspace to two unmanned Predator drones.”

“The ACLU called drones “a large step closer to a surveillance society in which our every move is monitored, tracked, recorded, and scrutinized by the authorities.” This week, the AP also reported that “the government worries they could collide with passenger planes or come crashing down to the ground.” Such concerns have reportedly subsided as the technology becomes more widely adopted.”

2013 – New York Times – U.S. Border Agency Allows Others to Use Its Drones

“As Congress considers a new immigration law that would expand the fleet of unmanned drones along the border, the agency in charge of border protection is increasingly offering the military-grade drones it already owns to domestic law enforcement agencies and has considered equipping them with “nonlethal weapons,” according to documents recently made public.”

Regarding CBP, “Additionally, the agency, in a 2010 report to Congress included in the documents, raised the possibility of eventually equipping its drones with “nonlethal weapons” to “immobilize” people and vehicles trying to cross the border illegally. In a statement on Wednesday, the agency said it had “no plans to arm its unmanned aircraft systems with nonlethal weapons or weapons of any kind.””

2014 – Wall Street Journal – (1) U.S. Border Protection Agency Grounds Drone Fleet (January);

“The U.S. Customs and Border Protection grounded its fleet of drones after one lost power while flying Monday night and crashed in the Pacific Ocean.”

2014 – Immigration Prof Blog (2) Drones Back Patrolling U.S./Mexico Border (February)

“It continues to amaze me that the U.S. government uses drones to patrol the U.S./Mexico border, a tactic that strikes me as something out of a science fiction movie like “Escape from New York.””

To learn more about coming to the U.S. without worrying about predator drones overhead, call a licensed immigration attorney who can help answer questions about the legal immigration processes. Being intercepted and detained by CBP is not a fun way to start a new life in the land of the free and the home of the brave.

Attorney KiKi M. Mosley is licensed to practice law by the State of Illinois and Louisiana. She is skilled and experienced in complex immigration law issues including applications for temporary immigration relief and adjustments of immigration status. For more information about the law firm, please visit www.KiKisLaw.com, and do not forget to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” on Twitter. You can also review Attorney Mosley’s endorsements on her Avvo profile.

Criminal conduct can lead to nonimmigrant visa revocation and removal from the U.S.

Once a nonimmigrant visa is revoked ICE may initiate removal proceedings to deport the individual if they otherwise do not voluntary leave the U.S.

Once a nonimmigrant visa is revoked ICE may initiate removal proceedings to deport the individual if they otherwise do not voluntary leave the U.S.

Justin Bieber’s recent arrest in Florida for DUI, street racing and resisting arrest without violence has people talking about immigration as the singer is not an American citizen.  Bieber is a Canadian residing in the U.S. on a performance visa known as an O-1 visa, described by the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”) as follows: “The O-1 nonimmigrant visa is for the individual who possesses extraordinary ability in the sciences, arts, education, business, or athletics, or who has a demonstrated record of extraordinary achievement in the motion picture or television industry and has been recognized nationally or internationally for those achievements.[i]” If convicted on pending and possible charges from several recent incidents, Bieber could be deported, according to one Immigration and Customs Enforcement (“ICE”) agent quoted in the article, “Justin Bieber Drugs, Rehab and Deportation According to ICE Official.[ii]

Nonimmigrant visas can be revoked for several reasons including criminal conduct.

When a nonimmigrant visa applicant seeks a visa to come to the U.S. to work, they apply through a U.S. embassy consular office and that visa can be revoked if the visa holder becomes ineligible to maintain the nonimmigrant visa, which can occur for a variety of reasons. There are criminal and related grounds for visa ineligibility, among other additional reasons a visa can be revoked.  An excerpt from the statute containing grounds for visa revocation identifies criminal and related issues and states, “…any alien convicted of, or who admits having committed, or who admits committing acts which constitute the essential elements of (I) a crime involving moral turpitude (other than a purely political offense) or an attempt or conspiracy to commit such a crime, or (II) a violation of (or a conspiracy or attempt to violate) any law or regulation of a State, the United States, or a foreign country relating to a controlled substance…[iii]

What constitutes a crime of moral turpitude, for purposes of visa ineligibility, is a unique question best answered on a case-by-case basis, and a licensed immigration attorney may be necessary to represent the nonimmigrant. While it may not always be clear what constitutes a crime for moral turpitude, it is clear that multiple criminal convictions can trigger visa revocation and deportation. In addition to what is stated above, the ineligibility statute also states regarding multiple convictions, “Any alien convicted of 2 or more offenses (other than purely political offenses), regardless of whether the conviction was in a single trial or whether the offenses arose from a single scheme of misconduct and regardless of whether the offenses involved moral turpitude, for which the aggregate sentences to confinement were 5 years or more is inadmissible.” In other words, the combination of options that could trigger visa revocation can be complex.

What happens if a nonimmigrant visa is revoked as a result of criminal activity?

If revoked, the visa will be stamped “REVOKED” and if the visa holder is not present at the time of revocation (or the visa is not available) additional authorities may be notified, including airline personnel. Once a visa is revoked the holder will not be permitted to enter the U.S. and can be detained while traveling to the U.S. Once a nonimmigrant visa is revoked ICE may initiate removal proceedings to deport the individual if they otherwise do not voluntary leave the U.S. Note that ICE may use “prosecutorial discretion” in deciding whether to proceed with removal. Click/tap here to read more about prosecutorial discretion.

Removal proceedings can be challenged and a visa reinstatement may also be applied for by the nonimmigrant visa holder and/or their attorney. The complex immigration and criminal law rules are best followed with an experienced licensed immigration attorney who understands the effect of the options available in criminal courts and how they can affect nonimmigrant visa status.

If you or someone you know who holds a nonimmigrant visa is involved in police activity and is charged with an offense, which if convicted could trigger deportation, you can call the Law Offices of KiKi M. Mosley to learn what options are available to prevent being deported. Attorney KiKi M. Mosley is licensed to practice law by the State of Illinois and Louisiana. She is skilled and experienced in complex immigration law issues. For more information about the law firm, please tap/click here to visit the rest of the website, and do not forget to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” on Twitter or Google Plus.

Prosecutorial Discretion in Immigration Enforcement

What happens if an undocumented person is detained by ICE but poses no significant threat to safety or security?

What happens if an undocumented person is detained by ICE but poses no significant threat to safety or security?

A recent article in the L.A. Times highlighted a reported rise in the use of prosecutorial discretion in United States immigration system. There are many undocumented immigrants in the U.S., many of whom want nothing more than to reside in the U.S. legally in hope of eventually obtaining U.S. citizenship. ICE officers and their departments are under a directive to prioritize whom they prosecute under the current immigration laws for removal.  They are expected to target those with criminal backgrounds and those whom they otherwise believe pose a threat to national security.

The article on prosecutorial discretion suggests that, “Immigrants facing deportation are increasingly likely to have their cases dismissed because of mitigating factors such as having U.S. citizen children, according to an analysis by researchers at Syracuse University.”[i]  In reality, the use of prosecutorial discretion varies widely between jurisdictions and is often up to the attorney assigned to the case at that particular time by the Office of Chief Counsel for DSH/ICE.

Prosecutorial discretion in immigration means ICE should focus on national security and public safety.

In 2011, the director of ICE, Mr. John Morton, issued a memorandum directing that immigration officials review a few factors before making the decision to prosecute the individual and seek a removal order from the very busy immigration courts. Factors for consideration include how many years the person has been living in the U.S., how and when they arrived in the U.S. (as a child 10 years ago?), whether their family members served in the military, and also the person’s relationship to other family members who are U.S. citizens[ii].

The 2011 orders sent to ICE field office directors, special agents in charge and chief counsel focus on the civil immigration enforcement priorities. The memo states in its “Background” section that, “ICE must prioritize the use of its enforcement personnel, detention space, and removal assets to ensure that the aliens it removes represent, as much as reasonably possible, the agency’s enforcement priorities, namely the promotion of national security, border security, public safety, and the integrity of the immigration system.”

What happens if an undocumented person is detained by ICE but poses no significant threat to safety or security?

If an undocumented immigrant is arrested and detained on suspicion of being a threat to public safety, as ICE memorandums describe, an attorney can intervene and work to negotiate a release or dismissal of pending charges, as suggested in the Los Angeles Times article suggesting more frequently, ICE is using prosecutorial discretion and letting people go about their lives.  If you want to learn more about prosecutorial discretion or believe someone you know if being improperly detained and prosecuted you can call attorney KiKi M. Mosley to find out what options might be available to help.

Attorney KiKi M. Mosley is licensed to practice law by the State of Illinois and Louisiana. She is skilled and experienced in complex immigration law issues. For more information about the law firm, please tap/click here to visit the rest of the website, and do not forget to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” on Twitter or Google Plus.


[i] Los Angeles Times: Prosecutorial discretion on the rise in immigration courts. By Cindy Chang. Jan. 15, 2014

[ii] U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Prosecutorial Discretion Memorandum. By John Morton, June 17, 2011.

Attorney KiKi M. Mosley interviewed about immigration reform and new immigration options

Chicago Immigration Attorney, KiKi M. Mosley was recently interviewed on the Law Talk Radio Internet radio podcast regarding immigration reform and new options for immigrants seeking legal status.

Immigration reform has been in the spotlight of several news programs, professional groups and several websites and social media pages devoted to the development of a United States immigration system that reflects present day values, politics and a mobile work force. Comprehensive reform remains a goal of many and today immigration attorney, KiKi M. Mosely is our guest to share correct information about the status of immigration and reform today.

Immigration reform has been in the spotlight of several news programs, professional groups and several websites and social media pages devoted to the development of a United States immigration system that reflects present day values, politics and a mobile work force. Comprehensive reform remains a goal of many and today immigration attorney, KiKi M. Mosely is our guest to share correct information about the status of immigration and reform today.

Attorney Mosley explained that comprehensive immigration reform is not yet the law in the United States. Rather, the proposed bill better known as “Boarder Security Economic Opportunity and Immigration Modernization Act, also known as S744,” did pass the United States Senate but it failed in the House of Representatives.   Attorney Mosley further stated that she receives two to three calls per day from people seeking protection under what they believe is the new immigration reform law. Additionally, she suggests that what we may end up seeing in the way of reform could appear somewhat different from the currently proposed bill.

Is there a reason opponents to S744 dislike the bill or is this just partisan opposition?

The main sticking point according to Attorney Mosley is Southern border security, and many Republican oppose the current bill as written. The five main sections of the current bill are generally referred to as: Boarder Security; Immigrant Visas; Interior Enforcement (of current immigration laws); Reform to the Non-Immigrant Visa program; and Jobs for Youths.

Topics covered in the Law Talk Radio interview, (click/tap the title to listen) “About Immigration Reform and Options with KiKi M. Mosley” include the following: (1) The status of our immigration system today and the issues regarding reform; (2) What immigrants to the U.S. should know about Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA); (3) Provisional (Stateside) Waivers, who may apply for them and what is involved; (4) Additional advice for men, women and families desiring U.S. citizenship.

Highlights of this interview address immigration reform, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, Provisional Waivers and immigration information, generally.

Everyone wants “the new law,” but again, things are still in the air until the House of Representatives votes to pass a version of the Act satisfying Southern Border Security concerns.

What is unique about the Bill as proposed are the five elements are tied together with a system of triggers and stages. By example, in order for the Registered Provisional Immigrant Status, to come into effect, which would allow undocumented immigrants “come online” and drive legally, and make steps to move closer to lawful permanent residence, this subsection may require agreement and accomplishment on Southern Border Security.

Attorney Mosley also opined that many of the members of the House of Representatives are not happy with the notion that several thousand undocumented immigrants who entered illegally may be rewarded with a Registered Provisional Immigrant Status. She identified a few bars to this status, such as drinking and driving violations, criminal convictions, domestic violence infractions and so forth.

Listen to the interview by clicking/tapping here to listen to further detail and explanations about the RPI program and more immigration reform issues including Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals and Provisional (Stateside) Waivers.

Attorney KiKi M. Mosley is licensed to practice law by the State of Illinois and Louisiana. She is skilled and experienced in complex immigration law issues. For more information about the law firm, please tap/click here to visit the rest of the website, and do not forget to “Like” the firm on Facebook and “Follow” on Twitter or Google Plus.